Arts & Culture articles

Garret’s Movie Palace: Inferno

Garret’s Movie Palace: Inferno

Close on the heels of his deeply felt “Sully,” Tom Hanks takes his art down a peg with another paycheck performance as the dramatic cipher Robert Langdon in “Inferno,” Ron Howard’s mostly lame adaptation of Dan Brown’s wholly lame novel. I have no prejudice against Brown. His breakthrough novel “The Da Vinci Code”—a conspiracy thriller

Garret’s Movie Palace: The Accountant

This high-concept story follows a high-functioning autistic accountant who moonlights as a bookkeeper for criminal organizations, only to find himself targeted by one of his clients and forced to reveal that (surprise!) his particular set of skills includes more than just crunching numbers. It’s an intriguing set-up made even more so by the fact that

“Darktown” by Thomas Mullen: A Book Review

Atria Books—An Imprint of Simon and Schuster, Inc., 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020 “I must tell you, it was not easy for me to raise my right hand and say, ‘I, Willard Strickland, a Negro, do solemnly swear to perform the duties of a Negro policeman’—Officer Willard Strickland, Atlanta Police Department,

Garret’s Movie Palace: Fall Movie Preview: Part II

In the last issue of Spare Changes News, I mentioned that I was going to do a two-part fall movie preview in order to review a myriad of movies I saw between the beginning of September to the present. Part 1 included reviews of the movies “Sully” and “Snowden,” the former being slightly better than

Michael Patrick MacDonald: Families of All Souls “Are all Dealing with Heroin”

(Photo: Bill Brett) When Michael Patrick MacDonald walks down ‘methadone mile’ he sees a familiar story among the addicts and panhandlers. “Most people down there come from places like I come from,” MacDonald said. Places of “poverty” and “trauma.” MacDonald grew up in the Old Colony housing projects during the height of the cocaine epidemic

Penn State Professor Hopes to Add Voices Through Homeless Narratives

Penn State Professor Joshua D. Phillips opened his latest book, “Homeless: Narratives from the Streets,” with a Mother Teresa quote, “Today it is fashionable to talk about the poor. Unfortunately, it is not fashionable to talk with them.” Phillips’ book, which served as his graduate dissertation from Southern Illinois University, is taken from spending 2012

Dark Matter by Blake Crouch: A Book Review

Crown Publishers, an Imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, New York. www.crownpublishing.com “What might have been and what has been point to one end, which is always present. Footfalls echo in the memory Down the passage which we did not take Towards the door we never opened.”—T.S. Eliot

Prophets of Rage: “Elite Taskforce of Revolutionary Musicians” Take on Homelessness

By Ronald Dudley and Eric Falquero Courtesy of Street Sense / INSP.ngo. To say that Prophets of Rage is political doesn’t quite cover it. When reporters or pundits—from ABC to Bill Maher to Rolling Stone—call this combination of musicians from Cypress Hill, Rage Against the Machine and Public Enemy a “supergroup,” guitarist Tom Morello is

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