News articles

Work Intensifies to Keep Guns Away from Animal Abusers

A conviction for domestic violence in the U.S. strips a person of the legal right to possess a gun. It doesn’t matter if the conviction is a misdemeanor or a felony. The rationale for the federal law: Domestic violence is a red flag for future violence – including potentially deadly violence with a firearm. Scientific

They don’t care about us

By the time this issue of Spare Change hits the streets, this country will have voted, the mid-terms will have passed, and we will know whether checks and balances have been somewhat restored in Washington, or if a runaway congress led by a tyrannical racist buffoon will continue to be the order of the day.

Homeless children program hosts women’s breakfast

Nine-year-old Christian  and 12-year-old Miguel  received a standing ovation from 1,200 people after  performing a moving cello and violin piece at the 20th Annual Women’s Breakfast at Boston Marriott Copley Place. They are both alumni of Horizons for Homeless Children early education program, a non-profit serving more than 1,600 homeless children in Massachusetts each week.

Mayor Walsh speaks at national poverty conference

On Friday, Nov. 2, Mayor Marty Walsh spoke to a crowd at the Disrupting The Poverty Cycle Conference, hosted this year at the University of Massachusetts-Boston Campus Center. The conference, held biennially by Economic Mobility Pathways (EMPath), attracts researchers, community organizers, policymakers, and lower-income families to connect and discuss over two days new and innovative

Stagnant Wages and Rising Rents Squeeze the Middle Class Out of Boston

Boston, and Massachusetts overall, have been outpacing the country  on low unemployment numbers and providing housing for the poor, but a new report suggests that this growth is largely limited to the wealthy, and that upward mobility is on the decline. A new poverty report from the Boston Foundation’s research center titled “Boston’s Booming…But for

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