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A Few Items Rolling Around My Mind…

1) Bullies Why is it that in this state—or this country in general for that matter—do we need to have violence or death in order to confront an issue? This week’s crisis: Bullies. Welcome to the real world boys and girls—bullies have been around since the dawn of time, especially in schools where being a

Housing Lost, Housing Regained, Housing Kept

Robert L. Karash Homelessness in this world isn’t going away easily despite all efforts to eradicate it as a syndrome and all sincere attempts to help people back on their feet by giving them a hand up, not a hand out. People—including politicians and social scientists—like to say “The solution to homelessness is housing.” Although

In Fear of Poverty

“The prevalent fear of poverty among the educated classes is the worst moral disease from which our civilization suffers.” When William James, ostensible father of American Psychology, penned this line over a century ago, he had embedded the idea in a discussion on religious experience, in which he also extolled the virtues of voluntary poverty.

Rain, Rain, RainBoW

Gregory Haygood Editor’s Note: The following passages are excerpts from a novella written by Gregory Haygood, which will be published under the name that appears above: Rain, Rain, Rain-BoW. The complete story will eventually be offered for purchase through sparechangenews.net. Keep watching the site and the newspaper for more information, and please contact our office

Fair Foods Two Dollar-A-Bag Program

Spare Change vendor and writer Rober Sondak has written much about nutrition, including a recent article about the Boston-based nonprofit Fair Foods (http://sparechangenews.net/news/fair-foods-fights-nutritional-insecurity). Fair Foods is a great resource for obtaining fresh produce without spend a lot of money, and it’s likely that one of their $2 bag programs is in operation in your neighborhood.

Honoring February's Events Through Poetry

Poets from across the Boston area gathered at Out Of Town News in Harvard Square Friday, February 12, to celebrate Abraham Lincoln’s birthday and Black History Month. Meanwhile, the artists in attendance also remembered those who lost their lives and the many more who were displaced by last month’s devastating earthquake in Haiti. The readings,

Street Profile: Gary's Story of Triumph and Tragedy

Dear readers, I have been writing for Spare Change for about a year now, and over the time I have been lucky enough to cover a variety of different stories. From State Representative Barry R. Finegold’s bill—which would grant hate crime protections to the homeless—to Theo and Paul Epstein’s Hot Stove Cool Music, a concert

Fair Foods Fights Nutritional Insecurity

On a wintry Tuesday in January, I boarded the bus in Central Square. Half an hour later a block from Boston Medical Center and proceeded to walk west on Washington St. until I came to the Cathedral Projects housing complex. I went the next block over to the South End Salvation Army shelter and asked

Why We Still Need Black History Month

In an article by Mema Ayi and Demetrius Patterson from the Chicago Defender, the authors wrote “Actor Morgan Freeman created a small firestorm…when he told Mike Wallace of 60 Minutes that he finds Black History Month (BHM) ridiculous.” Freeman goes on to say that “Americans perpetrate racism by relegating Black history to just one month

Spare Change Honors the Legacy of Howard Zinn

“Spare Change to me is an extraordinary illustration of what homeless people can do, because they can reach out to the public and say ‘Here we are,’ and we’re intelligent and sensitive people. We’re poets; we’re writers; we’re not crazy. We’ll tell you what caused our situation and we’ll ask you to do something about

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