Political articles

Jetpac: The New Face of Diversity and Inclusion

Jetpac: The New Face of Diversity and Inclusion

Although Jetpac is an acronym that stands for Justice, Education, Technology, Policy and Advocacy Center, it’s much more than that for Muslim Americans. Shaun Kennedy, Jetpac’s executive director, and Nadeem Mazen, its president, founded the nonprofit in December 2015 in order to increase civic engagement and community service in Muslim communities. Kennedy, who’s from Norfolk

“I Will Roll My Sleeves Up”: Mayoral Hopeful and City Councilor Tito Jackson Talks Housing, General Electric and Working-Class Boston

Photo: Alejandro Ramirez When Boston City Councilor Tito Jackson announced he was running for mayor—the sole challenger facing incumbent Mayor Martin J. Walsh—he presented himself as a champion of Boston’s working class. A working class that’s being forced out of their homes and their city, he said, while companies like General Electric get $25 million

Chris Faraone on Journalism in the Trump Era

When local alternative journalist Chris Faraone sparred with Andrew Breitbart—founder of Breitbart News, the ultra-conservative site that has promulgated racist, sexist and antisemitic content—in 2012, only one came out alive. Shortly after Faraone and Breitbart clashed on WRKO, Breitbart died. Faraone likes to claim credit for Breitbart’s early death—his book is entitled “I Killed Breitbart.”

Q&A with Elizabeth Warren: the senator talks about the presidential race and Wells Fargo scandal

Senator Elizabeth Warren at the opening of Cambridge’s Y2Y youth shelter. Photo: Zengzheng Wang. Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren has been one of the most prominent critics of Wall Street and big banks since the 2008 recession began. Her tough interrogations of bankers and businessmen in the Senate Banking Committee launched many viral videos, the most

Special Report: Attacks on LGBT people rarely prosecuted as hate crimes

Photo: Ludovic Bertron By Ned Parker and Mimi Dwyer Courtesy of INSP.ngo / Reuters Dionte Greene, a 22-year-old black gay male, was looking for a hook-up. He reached out to an 18-year-old stranger on Facebook. “I’m not interested in smoking weed with you, Travone,” Greene wrote to the teenager, Travone Shaw, in their first exchange.

NOT AFFORDABLE: The battle for Egleston Square

The Boston Redevelopment Authority board approved a controversial development in Jamaica Plain’s Egleston Square on Wednesday. Located at 3200 Washington Street, the mixed use development has raised concerns from local activists about affordability and displacement. The planned development will feature ground floor retail, 76 residential units, and 40 parking spaces. While the developer, 3190 Washington

BID ADIEU: Boston 2024 loses, vulnerable communities win

Boston’s bid to host the 2024 Olympic Games is dead, which is a huge relief for the homeless, low-income communities and people of color. Opponents of the bid argued that these populations were most in danger of displacement and harassment should the Summer Olympics have come to town. While the Atlanta 1996 Olympics are often

Going for the Gold: The 1996 Summer Olympics pushed out Atlanta’s poorest residents. What will happen if Boston wins its bid?

On December 16, Boston Mayor Martin Walsh went to California to speak to the US Olympic Committee in support Boston’s bid for the 2024 Olympic Games, despite mixed feelings back East. Boston is competing with Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington, DC to host the Games, and the topic’s been a source of debate among

MHSA Honors Rosenberg and Brunson for Tackling Homelessness

BOSTON, Mass.—State Senate Majority Leader, Stanley C. Rosenberg, and the Interim Clinical Coordinator at Bridge Over Troubled Waters, Richard Brunson, were honored for their outstanding contributions to reducing homelessness in Massachusetts at the Massachusetts Housing and Shelter Alliance (MHSA) annual meeting this year. “This year’s Canon Brian S. Kelley Public Servant Award is particularly a

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